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Touching the Earth: Turning the Mind to the Roots

With Akincano M. Weber recorded on April 10, 2022.

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During this session we discuss the teaching on ‘wisely directing one’s attention to the roots’ (yoniso manasikāra). It is a remarkably pragmatic approach to contemplative practice and one of Early Buddhism’s unique contributions to the human emancipatory effort from suffering.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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