A Practical Approach to Understanding Right Effort

With Dave Smith recorded on July 22, 2018.

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All schools of Buddhism acknowledge that if we are to “awaken” in this lifetime, our aim is to cultivate and develop the eight-fold path. This path consists of behavioral (sila), meditative (samadhi) and philosophical (panna) dimensions. When skillfully interwoven, this system of training directs us towards a liberation-based lifestyle by embracing the limitations and the possibilities of the human experience.

In recent years, the practice of mindfulness has exploded across the global landscape as a tool for self-improvement. Despite the current trends and hype, mindfulness practice can be limited if it does not have a specific focus or aim.

As a system of mental training, the development of mindfulness must also be supported by the path factors of effort and concentration. When balanced accordingly, these factors lead to the development of wisdom, equanimity and genuine happiness.

During this online teaching session, Dave outlines the role and the goal of establishing the four great efforts, as outlined in the Pali canon.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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