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Mindfulness of feeling tone (vedana).

With Martine Batchelor recorded on April 12, 2015.

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During this session Martine practices and explores mindfulness of the feeling tones, which is the second foundation of the practice of mindfulness.

First, she guides a meditation on mindfulness of the feeling tones. Afterwards she tries to define feeling tones and how to be mindful of them in our daily life. The Pali term Vedana refers to the affective tone of experience. When we come into contact through one of our six senses with the environment, we experience a pleasant, unpleasant or neither pleasant nor unpleasant feeling tone.

It is important to see that feeling tones are constructed, they are not a given, they do not reside in the object we come in contact with. It is vital to be aware of feeling tones as they arise extremely fast and have a profound impact on our behaviour.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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