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Practicing for the love of it.

With Martin Aylward recorded on January 17, 2016.

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Before the session Martin wrote: “A Burmese teacher once told a friend of mine to always enjoy his practice. We love meditation in theory, and we want to grow and transform, and we certainly would like to be liberated from our suffering. And yet! We easily turn meditation into a chore, and feel discouraged by our spiritual ‘progress’ or lack of it.”

This class explores holding our practice lightly, while really committing our heart to it, with time for meditation, reflections from the teacher, and interactive video discussion with participants.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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