Click here to join our daily meditations to support establishing a regular sitting practice.

Warrior heart: transforming anger into strength, dynamism and creativity

With Martin Aylward recorded on October 8, 2017.

Found our teachings useful? Help us continue our work and support your teachers with a donation. Here’s how.

Dharma teachings point to how dangerous and destructive anger is, and how words and actions can cause great suffering. This class looks at skilful means for meeting and exploring anger, and for understanding and transforming it. Martin leads a specially oriented meditation, and his talk explores the inner strength and confidence which can arise from being skilful with anger.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

Discussion

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Discover more from the Dharma Library

  • Nathan Glyde

    Daily Meditation Recordings, with Nathan Glyde – Week of March 21, 2022

    This week’s topic is: Harmonising Our Life. The Buddha’s wisdom highlights how we often live entangled in stress and distress. The earliest mentions of this disharmonious state called it being in an argument with life. Dharma teachings invite us away from habitual rigidity and reactivity into a responsive and harmonising release. This week we will uncover deeper and more creative ways of attuning to life that support inner and outer freedom and well-being.

    Read More

  • Vimalasara Mason-John

    Pride Every Day of Our Lives

    Pride celebrations are dedicated to celebrating the freedoms we have as LGBTQIA2S+ people and for campaigning for the human rights of Queer and Trans people around the world. 50 years ago the Gay Liberation Front held their first march in London. I was a kid, when history was being made. History is still being made…

    Read More

  • Gregory Kramer

    How Family and Work Shape Our Character and so Influence Our Path

    Gregory writes: “Obviously our Dhamma practices infuse our lives (if not, something is amiss). We don’t usually talk about how this flows the other direction: the qualities we develop in our personal and professional lives strongly impact our Buddhist path. That’s what I’ll be speaking about, drawing examples from my own life in music, inventing,…

    Read More

  • The voiceless voice of awareness.

    How often does it seem that the master of your life is the conditioned mind? To what degree does this mind of limitation color your experience? When the conditioned mind reigns, it becomes difficult to hear the still, small, voice within. This voice could also be talked about as the voiceless voice of awareness itself….

    Read More

  • Zohar Lavie

    The Wisdom of No Escape

    Our lives include facing things we didn’t choose, and often cannot change; such as getting ill or injured, or loosing something or someone that we love. Dharma teachings invite us to turn towards these, instead of turning away from them. What is the wisdom that is available to us when we meet our experience with…

    Read More

  • Oren Jay Sofer

    Meeting Grief with Love

    Amidst so many changes and so much loss this year, many of us are grieving. We may be grieving the loss of a loved one, of our own health, of a job, or even a way of life. Come gather in community to explore how we can meet our grief with tenderness, create space to…

    Read More

  • Oren Jay Sofer

    Cultivating Wise Energy

    Everything we do in life depends on energy, but the modern world has a destructive and exploitative relationship with energy. What is wise, balanced energy in spiritual practice? How can we establish this in the face of societal pressure and norms, and how can it be a resource in our daily life?

    Read More

  • photo of Martin Aylward smiling

    Intimacy and infinity: beyond inner and outer.

    WorldwideInsight.org’s founding teacher Martin Aylward explores the tension we tend to feel between inner experience and outer engagement, self and world, being and doing. Martin leads a guided meditation and offer teachings on cultivating an inclusive practice, where our contact, curiosity and care go to whatever arises, whether ‘in here’ or ‘out there’.

    Read More