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What is this?

With Martine Batchelor recorded on October 11, 2015.

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In this session Martine leads a guided meditation on the question “What is this?”, and then explores this questioning practice as a means to encounter each moment with awareness and as a means of developing a stable and open heart.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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