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Daily Meditation Recordings, with Martin Aylward – Week of April 6

photo of Martin Aylward smiling

Martin Aylward

We’re fortunate that Martin Aywlard has generously offered to lead our daily meditation sessions for Europe and the UK. To find out more about Martin, and to view his other contributions to Sangha Live, click here.

Monday Session

April 6, 2020

Tuesday Session

Demands, defences and distractions (with chanting)

April 8, 2020

Taking refuge (with chanting)

April 9, 2020

Paradoxes (with chanting)

April 10, 2020

View the text for the daily chants Martin offers this week

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