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Getting Real with Spiritual Bypass

With Daigan Gaither recorded on November 14, 2021.

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Spiritual bypassing is a superficial way of glossing over problems in a way that might make us feel better in the short term, but ultimately solves nothing and just leaves the problem to linger on. This session is an opportunity to begin to understand the concept of Spiritual Bypass (as coined by John Welwood in his book “Toward a Psychology of Awakening”) and how to practice with it.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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