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Mindful of Race: Transforming Racism from the Inside Out

With Ruth King recorded on May 20, 2018.

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Racism remains one of the most rooted and painful impasses of our time. Why is this so? And what does this have to do with you? In her talk, drawing from her recent publication, Ruth explores an understanding of our individual and collective racial conditioning and its social proliferation, and how mindfulness provides a foundation for inner confidence, stability, and courage, fostering a culture of wise care.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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