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The role of the intoxicants (asavas) in driving suffering and allowing release.

With Gregory Kramer recorded on November 1, 2015.

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Worldwide Insight talk from Greg Kramer: “The Role of the Intoxicants (Asavas) in Driving Suffering and Allowing Release”. Guided meditation, Dharma talk and Q&A.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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