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What is the Ultimate Truth?

With Christopher Titmuss recorded on June 5, 2022.

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The world of mind-body, mindfulness, meditation and well-being maximises priority on conventional or relative truth. This requires wise attention and change relative to our experience.

We are familiar with taking up views, remaining neutral with views or holding onto views. We might call these views relative or absolute.

Can we discover (ultimate) truth not bound to perception, not bound to mystery, not bound in any way at all?

This question lies at the heart of the deepest exploration.

(Click here to view transcription on Christopher’s website.)

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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