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Bringing the world into the heart.

With Caverly Morgan recorded on May 7, 2017.

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What does it mean to bring the world into the heart?

In these divided times, for those of us practicing peace, for those of us dedicated to liberation, we’ve been offered a grand opportunity to accept what we haven’t been willing to accept. To give what we haven’t been able to give. To love what we haven’t been willing to love.

What else is possible when we allow our mistaken perception of an “other” to rest in the recognition of oneness?

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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