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Not two, not one: experiencing non-duality in the ordinary.

With Jaya Julienne Ashmore recorded on September 13, 2015.

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Worldwide Insight talk from Jaya Julienne Ashmore: “Not Two, Not One: Experiencing Non-Duality in the Ordinary”. Guided meditation, Dharma talk and Q&A.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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