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Exploring Karma, Choice and the Mind

With Lisa Ernst recorded on June 30, 2024.

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Karma is action in Buddhism, driven by intention. With practice we cultivate the ability to choose our response and our actions, internally and externally. We might think if our intentions are good our actions will follow, but our intentions are often under the influence of strong conditioning that prevents us from living our choices. But with committed practice, we can cultivate greater freedom to live from our truest intentions.

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