Restorative Stillness Even During Turbulent Times

With Ronya Banks recorded on July 19, 2020.

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“Enter into the stillness inside your busy life. Become familiar with her ways. Grow to love her, feel [her] with all your heart and you will come to hear her silent music and become one with Love’s silent song.” ~Noel Davis

You can tap into inner stillness and tranquility regularly during your days, even during the most turbulent times. This is not a disconnected stillness that comes from avoiding or denying challenging times. Instead, it is a space of total surrender that occurs while you are intimately engaged with life’s ups and down.

Join Buddhist teacher Ronya Banks today, as she highlights three of the Buddha’s specific teachings that support you in connecting to this restorative and healing stillness.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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