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Wisdom and compassion in our relationships: two sides of the same coin.

With Lila Kimhi recorded on July 3, 2016.

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Wisdom and compassion are two wonderful qualities that grow in us as our practice deepens. Diving into each one and into the inseparable nature of the two reveals the way in which they support and give rise to one another, and the way they manifest in our relationships: with ourselves, with others, with the world. Our ability to acknowledge, to discern and to inquire can support the opening of the heart so it can meet the pain in our relationships without fear, and be transformed by that meeting.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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