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Using the five aggregates as a strategy.

With Ralph Steele recorded on April 9, 2017.

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The aggregates are a reference to our sense of self. Working with form, feeling, perception, identification, and consciousness as we go through our daily lives will support equanimity. Most importantly, it will help us work with emotions with greater efficiency.

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