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Death and the dance of self.

With Paul Burrows recorded on November 8, 2015.

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The Buddhadharma is bursting with ways to find helpful perspectives on our troubles. With awareness and investigation we can unpack the nub of clinging which keeps us bound to old and unhelpful ways of seeing ourselves and the world. As we learn to work with self-centred clinging, we make ourselves available to a liberated perspective on our stress, worry, frustrations and even death itself. Drawing on the Satipatthana Sutta and the Heart Sutra, we explore the potential self-inquiry has to find a relationship of deep peace with life.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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