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Relational mindfulness: how to stay awake in our daily interactions and relationships.

With Deborah Eden Tull recorded on October 2, 2016.

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It is one thing to deepen our practice through silent sitting meditation or on retreat, but how do we bring our practice into the dynamic, messy, and beautiful field of human relationship? What if our daily interactions offer the perfect gateway for awakening? This dharma talk is about letting go of the needless efforting of our social conditioning and the habits of the mind of separation, and learning to reside in the freedom of presence and vulnerability. Relating “in the moment” with one another is a form of meditation itself that requires open-ness, courage, and curiosity and allows for intimacy and transformation.

Listen to the audio version below, or click here to download the mp3.

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