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Wide Dharma, wide path.

With Gregory Kramer recorded on November 13, 2016.

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Many of us long to experience the Buddhist path in all of our lives, but really only feel its aliveness when we meditate. There’s an incompleteness, a gap, when it comes to our everyday activities and our relationships, where we catch only a whiff of the truths of suffering and the Path. But when we understand that the Buddha’s discourses were not descriptions but prescriptions, not philosophies but real practices, a vision of Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha gets wider than we ever imagined.

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