The reality and experience of inner spaciousness

With Leela Sarti recorded on November 11, 2018.

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A sense of spaciousness is needed for inner change but the person of history obstructs the space that is always there. As our practice deepens space starts to replace self images. The more we are embodied and present, timelessness and space become more experientially available to us. The now starts to stretch and become wide and the sense of time becomes smoother. How can we awaken a spacious, grounded presence that does not contract in contact with experience?

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